Thursday, July 15, 2010

Results of the Contra Costa Show 2010

I need to keep up with my blog posts... I didn't realize I hadn't posted pictures from the Contra Costa show. I'd be happy to re-live that day with you :) It was so fun to go through the prep and the pre-stage jitters and to finally step on stage. I realized the importance of practicing posing when I went up there. The judges are not people you look to when you are on stage for reassurance because they are probably not smiling or giving you the thumbs up. I was the first competitor in my class to go on stage. Pretty scary for it to be my first show. I had fun with it and tried to exude confidence as much as possible. Overall, I placed 10 out of 15, not bad. It wasn't last, which was my goal. So, now I can check-off "compete in my first show" off my "To-Do Before I Turn 27" list :) Yeah!

The day before the show with "competition color" Jan Tana spray.

Me with the Ray's Built Tuff Gym crew

Post-show: Sobrina was amazed by the drastic tan.


Yeah! #1 - no matter what!
Monday, April 19, 2010

So close and self-sabotaging...

Jillian Michaels is right...what got me to this weight and what's stopping me from moving forward.

I was on track in March to just kill it this month and have my competition body by the end of this month. I'm super frustrated with myself that for the last three weeks, I've been holding steady at 137. 137 was my ending weight at the end of the first Tight Curves Transformation.

What is going on? I started slacking on my diet and hanging out with friends who like to eat. Why am I not telling "no"? A part of me does not want to be alienated from them because I don't want them to start questioning my nutrition plan (which we all know is a part of competing). I don't want to not hang out with my friends but I need to be around people with similar lifestyles so I won't be put in temptations way and won't be chided for competing. My trainer told me that I need to be selfish for at least 8 weeks and tell my friends and family what I'm doing and that they need to understand because I've never asked them for anything else... ok, that's step one.

The other part of me is afraid of failing and looking for the excuse now. Having my figure put under scrutiny is bringing back the feelings of uncertainty and rejection from being a chubby kid to the usual bikini insecurities from my teenage years. I need to push past that and stand up for myself against my insecurities. Jillian says that I need to find the pain, deal with it, and learn to be constructive and not self-destructive when I am under the stress. I half jokingly told Sobrina that I was going to eat that new KFC chicken sandwich, the one with no buns. She said, "think of how bad you'll feel about yourself tomorrow if you eat that now. " That's been resonating in my head.

I love envisioning my ultra tan abs in a sparkling figure bikini as I pose with the utmost confidence on stage because I know I'm rockin' it. Just got to keep going... so close that I can feel the excitement of being on stage...
Monday, February 1, 2010

This is the year!

Each year, we tell ourselves, “This is it! This is the year I finally get back into those ‘skinny jeans’” or “This is the year that I look like that picture again.” Yes, this is the year! Now, how do you get started?

Based on my Google search, fitness or weight loss goals consistently make the top 5, if not the top 3, of New Year resolution lists. I know it was on my list for the last three or four consecutive years. I was finally successful in losing weight and more importantly maintaining my weight loss in 2009, when I entered Tight Curves’ body transformation contest (www.tightcurves.net). Now I’m on the second phase of my fitness plan to reach my competition weight.

As a self-proclaimed fitness enthusiast and/or fitness junkie, I come across the same battles with myself every time I tell myself, “This is the day that I’m going to say ‘no’ to potato chips.” For some reason the thought of telling myself “no” makes me want to do it more and then my mind reacts by going into a panic.

Here are some tips for soothing the mental panic and setting achievable goals:

  1. Accept what you look like now so you can move on. Take a “before” picture. When I was at my peak weight in 2009, I knew I didn’t look my best, but I really didn’t know until I saw my “before” picture. Wow, what a reality check to see my nearly naked cellulited body squeezed into a bikini that was two sizes too small. My muffin top was revealed to me in a light that forced me to accept my current reality. I still have my before pictures posted on the side of my night stand as a reminder of how far I’ve come in my body transformation.
  1. Start incorporating your new habits slowly into your life. It’s tough enough to get yourself off the couch to go to the gym in the first place, so why do you think you can suddenly motivate yourself to go 5 days a week for the next 6 months? You’re likely to burn out. My advice would be to write down your ultimate goal and start breaking down the goals into milestones and then into daily tactics. Example: My ultimate goal is to reach 125lbs by May. My milestones are to reach 130 by the end of February by starting with weight training 3 days a week and cardio 3 days a week. After I am consistent with the 3 days of training and 3 days of cardio, I move onto to cleaning up my diet with cutting out soda or cutting out chips, etc. I see milestones as building blocks. Doing too much can cause a lot of disruption
  1. Tell your friends, your real friends, so they can support you. Weight loss programs such as Weight Watchers are successful because you get a community to support you. You can create your own by sharing your goals with your trusted friends. They will keep you in check because you know every time you see them they’ll ask you how your progress is. And if you derail, your real friends will encourage you to keep going, rather than encourage you to quit.